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Cricket Australia XI break three-year drought

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CA Chairman Wally Edwards’ interview with Four Corners

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Cricket Australia XI break three-year drought


Cricket Australia XI break three-year drought

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Cricket Australia’s staff XI have finally broken a three-year drought, scraping over the line by one wicket against the Crusaders XI at Hawthorn’s Scotch College.

Chasing 127 from 27 overs, the CA XI were reduced to 5-33 in the seventh over on the back of a bullocking start from James Bourke (12) who smashed three consecutive boundaries in the first over, before holing out going for a fourth.

Nick Pryde (9) looked positive but was given out LBW despite the ball moving zealously down the leg side, with Jarod Pickering, Jacob Tait and Mitchell Lane unable to progress after quick wickets.

With the middle order struggling, Kieran McMillan (25) anchored the innings with a perfect balance of attack and defence, pairing with Apurwa Sarve (15) before the captain was stumped off the bowling of Melbourne Stars WBBL spinner Alana King (1-15).

After Aaron Pereira (5) was run out soon after, things were dicey before recruit and former CA staff member Divye Goyal (30*) made a mammoth contribution to boost the score up near the required total.

After McMillan was caught on the boundary and Goyal retired not out, it was down to Dan Allan and Melbourne Renegades WBBL all-rounder Briana Binch to get the final 30 runs, after Pan Ward (1) was removed.

It was a case of no pressure too big for the two, Allan (19*) smashing four boundaries and Binch (5*) finding the rope once to see the CA XI home with 12 balls remaining.

Earlier, it was Briana Binch who did the damage with the ball, claiming 2-22 from her four overs, captain Apurwa Sarve (2-16) pivotal with his left-arm spin bowling.

Dan Allan and Aaron Pereira (1-18) sent the ball through with pace, Pereira unlucky not to have a second scalp after a brilliant moving effort from wicket-keeper James Bourke went to ground.

Bourke well-and-truly made up for it with a great leg-side catch off Mitchell Lane (1-15), Kieran McMillan (1-12) the other wicket-taker in tandem with a number of boundary line saves.

CA XI captain Apurwa Sarve said “this is the greatest moment of my Cricket Australia career".

mk


CA Chairman Wally Edwards interview with Four Corners


CA Chairman Wally Edwards interview with Four Corners

Four Corners (4C): Wally, first of all thank you very much for doing this. It’s appreciated. Tell me about the changes you helped bring about to Cricket Australia in terms of better governance.

Wally Edwards (WE): Yes, well that was a very interesting process that we went through in Australia. I’d been on the Australian Cricket Board for 16 years before I took on the role of Chairman and during that time I think we’d tried about four times to look at our governance and make changes and each time the efforts didn’t get anywhere because one or two or three constituents weren’t wanting to talk about it. So the first board meeting I chaired as Chairman, the Carter-Crawford Report was tabled and this was initiated from a large cricket conference which Cricket Australia put on in I think about 2010 where we pulled about 200 people from the cricket world, all over Australia, and we brought them to Melbourne to talk about cricket, how they perceived it, what they thought was good, what they thought was bad, and the message we got out of that process was that they thought cricket was disjointed, wasn’t necessarily administered well and that we should do it better. So the board took it on board and started the process of getting some experts to tell us how we might go about it and that was the Carter-Crawford Report that landed in my first board meeting as Chairman.

So that was big progress getting to that point and as Chairman I had a big job to sell that of course and find consensus, fertile ground where we could go and where we couldn’t go because there were a lot of recommendations. And I think after many, many hours of talking and many, many thousands of kilometres travelled, we reached a very agreeable point from all stakeholders points of view and then we were fortunate enough to make the change in a unanimous way which I think is very important in these sort of things so that you don’t have a legacy that you have to keep dealing with. So that was all approved and we’ve gone from a board of 14 delegates sent by the states to the board to a nine member board that are fully independent of cricket in the states. So they sit at the Cricket Australia Board without any conflicts. Our role on the Cricket Australia Board is to develop cricket in Australia to the best of our ability. And I can say that it’s working very, very well.

4C: Well you’ve touched on a key subject there which is independence of the board. Shouldn’t the ICC Board be fully independent?

WE: Well it’s a different animal. It is a collection of 105 nations at the current count. It was set up over 100 years ago by Australia, England and South Africa as a members organisation. A meeting point to be able to organise international tours, perhaps talk about where cricket was at, but basically set up for that role. It has evolved and grown enormously in the last 10 or 12 years but  it’s evolved to a point where it still is what it is, it is still a members organisation and it does a specific job which is to give a forum to international discussions about not even the laws of the game which are controlled by the MCC, but talk about playing conditions, codes of conduct, all those sorts of things and facilitate member countries, organising tours and issues to do with cricket.

4C: Well to ask a question that many of our viewers might ask, if the ICC is indeed a members organisation, who governs cricket?

WE: Cricket is governed fundamentally at national level, I think you have to start there. In Australia Cricket Australia governs cricket.  And that’s the way it’s set up, it’s set up a bit like the political separation of powers. You’ve got the laws with the MCC, you’ve got ICC organising international issues and then you have the member country itself organising its own affairs in its own country and that’s the way it is. I think for it to change, it will be a long procedure. You’re not going to change things like that rapidly.

4C: So that means that the ICC is essentially a collection of entirely self-interested people?

WE: Well yes and no. I think, perhaps, it’s been that way in the past. It probably trends from one to the next depending on the people to a degree and the agendas that are running at the time. But I can say that in my term as an ICC Director I think we’ve made an enormous amount of progress in terms of working cooperatively with other countries and moving the ICC forward in terms of what sort of organisation we want it to be, manage current situations and current issues and to have a productive organisation that is achieving something.

4C: What were your first impressions of the ICC when you first joined?

WE: Well I have to say my first ICC board meeting – it shocked me to be honest. When you become a director of the ICC you sort of have a bit of a grounding from the previous chairman in terms of this is what happens and that is what happens. And we get reports back to the Cricket Australia Board about what happened at the last meeting, and he had painted a picture that things weren’t travelling that well, but I have to say that being there and experiencing the first meeting I was shocked and disappointed I have to say. But the lack of discussion, the lack of debate, even the lack of control of the meeting itself, it was a bit of a shambles I’d have to say and that disappointed me and I’m a person who is there because of cricket. I’m a cricketer and I’d taken a number of issues to ICC to make a difference with and I could tell from that meeting that this was going to be a long haul. There was very little cooperation and there was little ability to making a debating point and perhaps win an argument.

4C: So quite dysfunctional?

WE: I think that’s right. I think it was dysfunctional to a degree and I set about trying to improve things.

4C: Have you been able to do that? Is it functioning better now?

WE: I’ve got no doubt. I think we’ve moved a long, long way. For an organisation as I said at the beginning that is entrenched in tradition and a whole multitude of different nations from all over the world, different cultures, different political issues, black, white, all of those things means that it’s not an organisation that is easy to change and easy if you like to have a revolution and put in a new broom. But I think we’ve made a lot of progress. In fact my second meeting was the day the Woolf Report was handed down and that sort of provided a grand agenda you might say of what the ICC might become but it didn’t really give us a roadmap of how you might go from where we were to where the vision was and perhaps that document will still form a roadmap for the future. As time goes I think we’ve made some good improvements, certainly the operation of the business is running a lot better I think, it’s becoming more focused. We only meet four times a year so progress isn’t a rapid thing because you only get together irregularly really and as I said earlier to change things in Australia took 16 years while I was on the Board and then a lot of work travelling Australia to do just our changes. The ICC is a much more complicated organisation and a lot more different agendas, ideas and beliefs.

4C: Let me ask you about the Woolf Review. Did you support the key recommendations in that review. Recommendations for greater independence on the board?

WE: Personally I supported them but I don’t think Lord Woolf really gave us an effective way forward though. He recommended that independents should be added to the board which I agree with, he recommended that the independents should outnumber the member directors, so he presented that as another element but then we’re sitting there with 13 member directors now, he never suggested how we might go from 13 to a lower number or indeed who should give up their role on the board. You’re talking about national pride here for nations, not easy and we would have ended up if you’d said, right let’s leave the existing status quo as it was, let’s leave that, let’s add 14 independent directors, even if you took that course, you’d end up with 27 directors which is a ridiculous concept in this world we’re in. So it’s a good idea and I would support it personally, I know Australian cricket would support it but at this point in time there’s no mechanism to be able to start that process off. Maybe in the future it will move forward.

4C: So, at the beginning of last year in early 2014 there was a restructure which took place. How did that come about from your perspective?

WE: Well, I have to say that I had a fair part to play in it. And it goes right back to the first day that I became chairman of Cricket Australia. I think within four or five days of that I got on a plane and travelled to India to meet Mr Srinvasan and other BCCI officials and at that first meeting in early November 2011 it was very evident to me that India were very uncomfortable with where the ICC was and what they were doing and how they were running cricket if you like and they had the belief that three quarters of the money that the ICC were spending was coming from their marketplace and they thought the ICC was wasting money, wasn’t achieving a lot and they’d like change. From that point on I was talking to them about my ideas and I wanted to get some change too, primarily in the cricketing world where I wanted to untangle the problems I had with just full members being able to play Test cricket, the glass ceiling so no one else could come in – even if you were in there and playing really bad cricket you couldn’t go out so from my point of view in Test cricket, in one day cricket I wanted to see a system introduced that would allow member nations to come up, and others if you’re not playing well enough you go down. Just that competitive tension would improve world cricket. So I had those agendas and I was talking to them from my angle and they were talking to me from their angle and that’s how it all started, but then on top of that, ICC the first one or two board meetings, the Woolf Report initiated more discussion at Board level and it was obvious from day one that discussing with the board that it was going to be very difficult progress to adopt, although I would say now in hindsight probably of the 65 recommendations I’d say at least 30 have been covered off in some shape or form, there’s a number that will take a lot longer I think if you do go down that path and that won’t be my role that will be someone else in the future’s role.

4C: There’s a perception that you and Mr Clarke and Mr Srinivasan were the architects of this restructure. What was Mr Clarke’s role in this and what were his views?

WE: Well I think we all came together in a very cooperative manner and we started talking as I said, I was only talking to India about my issues, their issues, then the Woolf Report came and the discussions got a bit wider. Then another element to lay in over the top was that we were leading to a new commercial rights cycle and that involved all members, all nations, committing to what’s called a Members Participation Agreement to guarantee that you would come and play in the ICC events, a contract if you like and this process was being run by management and it got to a point where India were refusing to participate in that agreement and therefore in the next series of ICC events. So this thing was going, management running it, I wasn’t involved, but at a point the President of the ICC said to both Giles and myself that we’ve got to a stalemate, he said to us, look see what you can do, see what you can flesh out as to how India might become a party to it because India were saying, “well you can have another commercial rights but we won’t be there.” So that’s what happened and those discussions then sort of rolled in over the top of it and over a period of probably two years we talked about how things could be structured and how the ICC might be a more productive organisation.

4C: So you’re saying then that the ICC held the rest of the ICC to ransom?

WE: No I don’t agree with that. I think they certainly had views, I think the reality of life is that it was a long negotiation over a lot of substantive issues. In Australia, my role, I took extremely seriously. Australia was a founding member of the ICC in 1906. We were also a founding participant in the world of international cricket back in 1877. So Australia takes its role in world affairs very, very seriously, I took my role very seriously. We have a bridging role there’s no question about that . India look to Australia for a lot of things. We have a bond that goes all the way back to Bradman. Bradman never played cricket in India but he’s a national hero in India and the reason for that was that he started if you like beating up the English at about the same moment  as Mahatma Gandhi started his uprising in India. So the Indians saw this man taking on England on the cricket field at the same time as they saw their own man trying to take on England in India. So there’s a bond there that goes back to that and an amazing relationship between Australia and India. They respect us and we respect them and as I said Australia has a very important role to play in bridging a lot of those gaps between India and other nations, India and England. I took my role very seriously, I am sure anyone you talk to from the ICC would say how I have worked very, very hard to make sure that small nations are not disadvantaged in any way in this process and I think what we’ve come out with is a very productive arrangement.

4C: Well let me ask you about that. The critics of the arrangement have said that the smaller nations have been done very badly by. What they say is that the smaller nations are getting much smaller proportion of the revenue, whether or not it is a bigger amount because of the new rights agreement. Isn’t that right? Why did you three decide to take the lion’s share of the revenue and why are the smaller countries getting much less?

WE: Well for a start, let’s start at the beginning with the smaller nations, they are all getting a healthy growth in their revenues over this next cycle. Even the smallest nation like Zimbabwe I think are going from $52m in the previous eight years to something like $75m in the next eight years. So I think Pakistan, those sort of nations will get double and the Associates are going from $120m over eight years to $210m over the next eight years. So there’s been a big lift in revenues. The premise you are making there is that India don’t deserve any more. That’s not true. India deserve a healthier part of the pie than they were getting because let’s face it, they create 75 per cent of the pie in the first place. If you look at  any measure how many fans of cricket are there in the world, what percentage comes from India? How many cricketers are there in the world, what percentage comes from India? They have a population of 1.2b and their number one sport is cricket. So they have a great need for more revenue. They could argue that they have a much greater need for revenue than say Zimbabwe or other nations. So I don’t think you can look it at that way. I think you can look at it and say, if this is going to be sustainable going forward you have to have a mechanism that rewards where the money comes from, what countries can bring to an ICC world event, what ICC is selling as their world events and in the end what I tried to achieve was that we wanted meritocracy which is a very important part of cricket so the better you are, the more you move up that ladder and you go down if you don’t achieve. We wanted meritocracy, a fair situation that incentivised people to get better. So if you develop a bigger cricket market in your country you will get more money. And really it was a case of ‘you help yourself and you’ll get support from the ICC.’ But the important element of it was, that nations have to help themselves as well. It’s not just a matter of going to the ICC and getting the money. So incentive, meritocracy, those concepts were important to introduce, not only on the cricket field but in the financial sense. That’s what we’ve done and I think the break-up is very, very fair and I think sustainable and also it will incentivise countries to do better going forward and that’s what it’s all about.

4C: All of that is absolutely understood. It is nevertheless in stark contrast to what Lord Woolf proposed. Does that mean that you simply think Lord Woolf is wrong?

WE: Well, I think in that case, yes. I don’t think you can say that a large cricketing nation is entitled to a way less proportion per head of cricketers than a smaller nation. I think meritocracy is very important and incentive and that’s what we’re saying. And I think he was wrong.

4C: Staying with incentives and meritocracy, the next World Cup. Why is the next World Cup being limited to 10 counties?

WE: Well, that decision was made before my time on the ICC board in 2011.  It is one of those debates that go round and round because a World Cup is a World Cup and there’s an argument to say that at the moment this is a fault of previous ICC and world cricket administrators - there isn’t enough quality teams to justify a 14-team World Cup. The ideal World Cup is a 16-team competition where you have four groups of four. We get criticised for having very long drawn out World Cup tournaments that go on and on and on and part of that is due to the fact that of the numbers and structure of it. Fourteen gives you two groups of seven, 16 gives you four groups of four which allows you to perhaps move the tournament a bit quicker and that would be ideal. But to really have an effective 16 teams you need probably 22 capable of getting there and being competitive and that’s plainly not the case. And that’s particularly one of the things I want to see improve. I want to see world cricket develop a lot more nations push their way up the system and then you’ll have better World Cups.

But going back to the 10, you know, it is not a guaranteed 10 teams in any way. The ICC in this next structure, the next commercial cycle, in year three of that cycle the only ICC world event is the qualifying event for the World Cup. So it’s been put there by itself. It’s planned to make this a significant event on the world cricket calendar, the qualifier, and in the end you’ll get 10 nations there but the whole 105 nations in the ICC can get there. It’s not a matter of any guarantees. So I think it’s a debate that can go on, but it’s been sold to the broadcaster as well into this next commercial rights deal, the 10-team World Cup is what’s been sold to the broadcaster, so it’s not going to be an easy one to change and as I say, I think it’s worth giving a go to this qualifier to see how well it can be in terms of a world event.

4C: I’m sure that will be a huge event, but there’s no denying is there it has caused great distress in countries like Ireland for example.

WE: Well I’d expect Ireland to qualify quite honestly. It shouldn’t cause them great distress. They should be backing their ability to get there. They can get there, there’s nothing stopping Ireland going to the World Cup. So I don’t see a problem in Ireland getting there, I think they will make it, but if they want guarantees then I don’t believe in that. There’s no such thing as a guarantee and there shouldn’t be a guarantee, that’s what I’ve been fighting for at ICC to break down in terms of who’s in the club to play Test cricket. There shouldn’t be any guarantees. If you’re not good enough you go down, if you’re good enough you come up and that’s what we achieved so I think a ten-team world cup in sustainable. The best teams will get there and who knows what they are. You have a look at the Champions Trophy for 2017 and the top eight ranked one-day teams qualify and the cut-off period is the end of September and at the moment the two countries fighting it out for the last spot are the West Indies and Pakistan. Bangladesh have really got going and they’re starting to win games and they’ve moved up the rankings and I think that’s fantastic because this is what rankings are for and what qualification is about. The West Indies and Pakistan, I’m sure they’re focusing a lot more on how well they’re playing because of that than if they just had guaranteed entry. So I think it’s good, I think qualification is what it’s all about. If Australia aren’t good enough, guess what? We won’t make it.

4C: Okay, let me ask you about something that came up yesterday at the MCC World Cricket Committee which is the proposal that cricket should enter the Olympics. Should cricket be an Olympic sport?

WE: Well from my perspective and Cricket Australia’s perspective, the answer’s yes. When that was last debated at ICC I debated hard and loud to bring it into the Olympics. I think it’s critical to develop the game on the world wide basis so I think it’s something that cricket should do. But when the debate was held the consensus wasn’t there or the numbers weren’t there, so that debate was lost but there’s still time for it to re-emerge. It’s great to see the MCC saying yay and I did note in their press release that the higher administrators of the ECB were making positive comments and I see that as a positive move as well.

4C: The fact is Giles Clarke has opposed it strenuously though?

WE: He has but I give Giles his due. He thinks he is doing what is right at the time and that’s protecting the English summer. From England’s point of view their argument is that the Olympics always fall in our summer therefore it will mess up our county competition and all our events that we’ve got on, our Test matches our one-dayers, something was going to give and that’s not acceptable to the ECB. So I know the ECB are thinking of restructuring their cricket summer anyway and perhaps that will open the door?

4C: Where do you see Test cricket going? Can it survive?

WE:  We all want it to and I think it will. Obviously it’s the number one format in England and Australia but one-day cricket ranks ahead of it in the other Test playing countries. But it’s a format that we all want to protect and I think in our reforms that we put through, we established a Test match fund which was an initiative of Mr Srinivasan  actually to support the lower seven Test match playing countries in recognition of the fact that most of the Tests that they play, they lose money on them. So this fund which is equivalent of $10m for each of those seven countries over the eight year period, $1.25m a year to subsidise their Test matches, the ICC obviously want them to start promoting and give them some funds to start promoting the concept of the game, the reasons why it is such a great game and why historically it’s got such significance. So the ICC has put that in place and hopefully it will have a very positive effect. But another element that I think you have to overlay on that is the quality of the broadcasts now of cricket. The ability of broadcasters with 20 different cameras, super slow mos, hot spots, technology, it’s quite compelling to stay at home and not go to the cricket and I think we have to recognise that and the broadcasters are paying good money of course to do all of that. They’ve still got a lot of people watching Test cricket but they’re not at the ground unfortunately.         

4C: And then of course there’s Twenty20 and the IPL. Is there a danger that the IPL will come to dominate world cricket? And if so is that a good or a bad thing?

WE: I don’t know if it will dominate. I believe that IPL has been good for world cricket. I think what it’s done is allow the top cricketers in the world to earn some really good money which has taken a lot of pressure of some of the lower nations in terms of what they’re paying their players, so it’s taken pressure away. I think it’s been fantastic for cricket the game. The innovation that’s been driven through the IPL has been quite incredible and the rate of change, not only in T20 but in 50 over cricket, a la the last World Cup and Test cricket even has been enormous. I think it’s had such a positive impact on the way the game’s changed, I’m sure that’s going to keep going and I think that’s going to make the longer forms of the game even more compelling. And if you look back to the Cricket World Cup in Australia and New Zealand, it was a huge success and the cricket was just fantastic to watch, whereas four years earlier a lot of people would say it was pretty boring, the Cricket World Cup where there wasn’t anywhere near the same amount of innovation both in batting and bowling, field placings and I think that it’s done wonders for the game quite honestly. So I’ve got no great fears. I think world has to make sure that it keeps thriving and not leave any voids for other forms to move into.

4C: Well, what’s your personal vision for the future and the development of cricket worldwide?

WE: Well as I said at the beginning, meritocracy’s the key. Countries have to be able to move up and down ladders based on their ability and how well they play cricket.  I think we’ve done, cricket has done a poor job over the last 30 or 40 years in developing nations.  If you look at other sports, soccer, these sorts of sports, they’ve moved from 10 competitive nations to 40 and cricket hasn’t really achieved that. If you look over the history of the last 40 years there’s only been one country come into world cricket and that’s Sri Lanka that has been a competitive nation and they won the ‘96 World Cup. Of course Bangladesh and Zimbabwe have come in the last 30 years but they are yet to show potential on the cricket field that we’d like to see and that’s what developing the game is all about, it’s about getting more nations playing, more nations being competitive  and the game will thrive.

4C: I have to ask you about yesterday’s events. What was your reaction when you heard what had happened in India?

WE: Well, for a start, it’s an Indian domestic issue. Cricket Australia don’t  pretend to give India advice on what they should do and what they shouldn’t do. To be honest, I don’t fully understand it. I haven’t delved into the inner workings of Indian cricket or cricket politics. We in Australia deal with the representatives that India have - their board members, their presidents, their CEOs. We deal with them for what they are and who they are and we don’t try and second guess them or give them gratuitous advice as we wouldn’t expect them to do to us if it was a Big Bash issue. So I wouldn’t try to comment on it. I think they’ll work through it and presumably they’re going to come out the other end a very strong cricketing nation and a very strong IPL.

4C: There are people now calling on Mr Srinivasan to step down as Chairman because of the judgement yesterday. Should he step down?

WE:  Well I don’t believe so. As I understand it he’s already divested all of his interests in the Chennai Super Kings, so he has no shareholding there anymore and don’t forget the Supreme Court of India made a positive affirmation that they had no objection to Mr Srinivasan taking on the chairmanship of ICC. So I don’t believe there’s any issue there, no.

4C:  Can I just be devil’s advocate for a minute, Wally? The Supreme Court asked Mr Srinivasan to step down as president of the BCCI. He may have divested himself from his own personal shares if you like in Chennai Super Kings, but as I understand his company is at least a part owner of the club and his son-in-law has been barred for life.  Doesn’t that put him in a very difficult position?

WE: Well as I understand it his company is not a shareholder any more, he’s divested all the shares in Chennai Super Kings to the shareholders of Indian Cements, so the shareholders and now the shareholders of Chennai Super Kings. But it’s not for me to comment on those internal politics because I don’t believe I can add anything. As I said, I am not a student of it and I don’t believe I can add much to the discussion.             

4C: Can I ask you if you had owned a team which had just been banned for two years and your son-in-law had been banned from cricket for life because of corruption would you still be Chairman of Cricket Australia?

WE:  It’s a very hypothetical question. I don’t think it would ever occur. But I make this comment, I’d say in all my dealings with Mr Srinvasan I found him very honest, straight forward, forthcoming. I’ve never had one issue that I could say, well he said that then and didn’t follow through. I found his input into what he believes is the way to run world cricket fantastic. I think he’s a very astute businessman, he’s very, very knowledgeable on Test cricket in particular. He would know more about Test cricket and Test matches that Australia have played in than I would and he’s a great student of the game and I found him a very, very honourable person to deal with so that’s all I can go by.

4C: So he retains the full support of the board?

WE: Absolutely. Absolutely.             

4C: I’m going to ask you one final question which I’m asking everyone. Why do you love cricket?

WE:  Well I played it for a start, so I’ve been brought up playing cricket since the time I could walk and I just think it’s a magnificent game. The complexity of it, the fact now that we’ve got three formats, I think is quite incredible. It is a challenge as we’ve spoken about, but I think the new format T20 has got potential to take the game all over the world. I’ve got no doubt about that. It’s a very, very exciting game. I think it’s enjoyable to watch, it’s obviously part of the Australian culture and I think it suits our summers beautifully.



Australian Cricket. Discover Our Story


Australian Cricket. Discover Our Story

In August 2014, Australian Cricket refreshed its strategy and extend to 2017.

To help bring that strategy to life and explain it in simple terms so that it becomes part of the Australian cricket vernacular, we have created some new supporting materials.

Please click here to see an animation of our story –  Australia’s Favourite Sport – A Sport for all Australians, that you can share with your people as well as your external stakeholders.

We hope that this provides a broader understanding of what it is we are trying to achieve as a sport and how your work directly relates to that.

Aside from this video story, there will be a range of additional supporting materials to assist with better understanding our strategy. 


QLD Cricket's head on approach to leadership


QLD Cricket's head on approach to leadership

Queensland Cricket’s most recent Leadership Development Program for staff had added impact with the addition of my FootDr Queensland Bulls and Australia ‘A’ players Usman Khawaja and Chris Lynn for the two-day course.

The duo joined Queensland Cricket staff for the program which defined leadership and canvassed a number of contemporary ideas and concepts around effective leadership.

All of the participants worked with the DISC model (Dominance, Influence, Steadiness and Conscientiousness) which provided a comprehensive breakdown of personal leadership style including strengths and limitations.

This component of the program was facilitated by Keith Ayres who is the principal of the Integro Leadership Institute, a Sydney-based consultancy.

A component of the program was devoted to the inevitability of change in today’s environment and the fact that promoting positive change and leading others through the change process are critical leadership responsibilities.

Former Wallaby player and current CEO of Icon Cancercare, Dr Brett Robinson, spoke during the second day of his leadership experiences both on and off the rugby field. 

Queensland Cricket General Manager – Commercial, Andrew McShea, said the introduction of the players had added significantly to the workshop.

“In some instances, the players had a different way of looking at things, and vice versa. I think it helped all of us better understand how we can positively influence a more productive and enjoyable workplace,’’ he said.

The Leadership Development Program was extremely successful and will in the future benefit Queensland Cricket employees who are either in leadership positions or likely to assume leadership responsibilities in the future.

The program increases an individual’s understanding of leadership, an appreciation of their own preferred leadership style as well as an understanding of the behaviours they need to display in order to maximise their leadership effectiveness.

While scheduling did not allow two elite female players to attend this particular course, future courses will incorporate Konica Minolta Queensland Fire members alongside the Bulls players.

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Queensland Cricket's leadership group


ACT unveils new home for region


ACT unveils new home for region

Cricket ACT will soon enter an exciting new era when it moves from a new home at Phillip Oval in Canberra.

The project which has come together through collaboration between Cricket ACT, Cricket NSW, Cricket Australia, AFL NSW/ACT and the ACT government will see cricket in the capital thrive with all-new administration and training facilities.

The new facilities come at a cost of nearly $6m and will include administration offices, a four lane indoor training centre, turf training facilities, gymnasium and functions rooms.

The new headquarters will be used to cater for the cricket community in the ACT and surrounding NSW country regions from high performance through to grass roots participation including Milo T20 Blast and multicultural programs.

Cricket ACT CEO Cameron French said he was excited by the potential of the new facility.

"To have an indoor training facility, gymnasium and turf wickets will mean that the youngest cricketers right the way up to our Comets and Meteors players will have a base to train and reach their potential."

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Kids give cricket a red-hot-go! // Cameron Walter


Cricket Victoria staff host multicultural cricketers at Victorian parliament


Cricket Victoria staff host multicultural cricketers at Victorian Parliament

Cricket Victoria staff members Simon Webb and Annie Hateley accompanied cricketers from the Wyndham Jags Cricket Club to Victorian Parliament last week.

They were introduced to Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews to discuss the success of the Jags Premier League tournament, which started in 2014 with 16 teams and doubled this year to become the biggest T20 tournament in Australia.

In 2013, CV was able to use population data from the ABS to support the anecdotal evidence that there was a growing community of migrants that were interested in cricket, playing cricket, coaching cricket and volunteering in cricket - they just hadn't been engaged by the formal structures of cricket.

Cricket Victoria’s Community Programs Manager, Annie, teamed up with the MyCricket Participation Analyst, Simon, to interpret the data, develop a strategy on how to connect with the community and engage them in the structures of cricket.

Simon was able to identify and target the locations for growth and opportunity across metropolitan Melbourne, while Annie used existing community connections within cricket and the South Asian community to consult for strategy development.

Since 2013, CV has experienced 248% growth in participation in the South Asian community.

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Cricket Victoria staff members Annie Hateley and Simon Webb in Victorian Parliament with members of Wyndham Jags Cricket  Club


From SEDA to NT Cricket Game Development Officer


From SEDA to NT Cricket Game Development Officer

NT Cricket Game Development Officer Ben Hodgart has just marked his one year anniversary with NT Cricket, with a four day visit to Timber Creek to support cricket activities at an Indigenous carnival named West is Best.

“The West is Best carnival is amazing, definitely one of the highlights of my year so far! The kids have so much natural talent and have had so much fun working with them. Working at NT Cricket has given me so many great opportunities to travel to remote communities and have such a good time with cricket, with both school-aged children and older cricketers through our community carnivals too,” he said. 

Ben completed his senior schooling through the SEDA program in Melbourne, successfully completing a Certificate 3 and 4 in Sport & Recreation and a Diploma in Sports Management. He was recognised with an outstanding achievement award and selected by Cricket Australia to undertake work experience and assist at the 2013 Imparja Cup in Alice Springs, impressing NT Cricket staff so much with his enthusiasm and can-do attitude that he was again invited to work during the 2014 Imparja Cup carnival. When a Game Development Officer role was advertised with NT Cricket last year, Ben was the successful applicant and happily packed up and moved north to Darwin.

“The NT Cricket team are a great bunch! We are a small team who works really well together. I’ve had the best year – the Imparja Cup is a really special event, the A Series held in Darwin last July was fantastic, my travels to remote communities are so rewarding, working with high profile players to conduct school visits, teaching cricket skills to kids, meeting great people. It’s all fantastic!” he said.

NT Cricket is a team with some unique challenges travelling to possibly the most remote areas of our country to deliver cricket programs. We take great pride in making cricket accessible as a sport for all Australians. 

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Ben (far left) at the Dingo Cup at Timber Creek in 2015


Welcome from SACA Chief Executive


Welcome from SACA Chief Executive

Around the Grounds will give us the opportunity to learn from and be inspired by our colleagues. This edition, we learn about outreach programs to culturally diverse communities in Victoria, a new home for cricket in the ACT and from my own state of South Australia, the story of how our entire organisation was inspired by an individual’s determination to support a worthy cause.

I look forward to reading more stories from around the country in the upcoming edition.

Keith Bradshaw

SACA Chief Executive

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SACA's Fundraising Wish


SACA's Fundraising Wish

In April this year, South Australian based CA Junior Participation Leader, Tom Rutherford undertook a solo, unsupported bike ride from Adelaide to Melbourne to raise money for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

On Monday 13 April, Tom packed up his bike, tent and a small backpack and set off from Adelaide. Along the way Tom stopped at 42-Mile Crossing, Warrnambool, Apollo Bay and Sorrento to name a few. Eleven days and 1,220 kilometres later Tom (and his bike) rolled into Melbourne. According to Tom “the best stretch of riding was Princetown (12 Apostles) to Apollo Bay through the Cape Otway forest, it is a beautiful part of the country”. Although the ride wasn’t all sunshine and rainbows, Tom also encountered some difficult conditions. “The hardest day was definitely from Mt Gambier to Portland as a storm that had recently flooded NSW passed over me for a few hours that afternoon.”

Although Tom undertook this tremendous ride solo, he had a great support network back at the SACA cheering him on. His fundraising page was full of messages of support and donations from his SACA colleagues. What was an even better demonstration of the SACA teamwork spirit was colleague and friend Wayne Bambrick’s dedication to keeping SACA updated about Tom’s progress. Wayne sent out daily updates and photos to all staff, taking us all on the journey with Tom. Wayne said, “All of the emails I received back from staff with well wishes for Tom were great and I passed them onto Tommy during his ride. He loved the support from everyone at SACA.”

SACA General Manager High Performance, Tim Nielsen was so impressed by Tom’s fantastic achievement that he arranged for Tom and his friends to attend the Tigers v Demons game at the MCG upon his arrival in Melbourne.  It was a well-deserved celebration for an outstanding achievement.

When the donation site finally closed the week following his ride, Tom had raised $4,600 for the Make-A-Wish foundation.

Tom was tested physically and mentally throughout his journey and showed incredible determination to raise money for a great cause. The support shown to Tom from SACA also demonstrated a great sense of ‘team’ and is worth highlighting to the Australian Cricket community. 

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Big Move and Big 150 for Cricket Tasmania


Big Move and Big 150 for Cricket Tasmania

2014-15 was a busy season for Cricket Tasmania, with all staff pitching in to prepare for a full season of national and international cricket at their further developed world-class venue.  The Blundstone Arena further development, including the launch of the Ricky Ponting Stand and new state-of-the-art function space, was completed in time for the much anticipated ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 which required all hands on deck.

On the 27th February staff packed up their space to move to a brand office building on one level, marking an exciting new chapter for Cricket Tasmania.   The buzz of the Cricket World Cup has now settled and staff are easing nicely into their modern and light surroundings with new views and an inaugural on-site café Plumb, set to open in the coming weeks.

Next year will mark the 150th Anniversary of Cricket Tasmania and this season the 150th Anniversary of the Cricket Tasmania Premier League. The 150th anniversary is a chance to reflect on the organisation’s history and in some way look to reward and acknowledge people that have contributed to the success of Cricket Tasmania and its history along the way. 

Cricket Tasmania hopes to make the 150th anniversary a memorable one for players (past and present), sponsors, employees, members, fans and customers by a variety of exciting initiatives in the pipeline to mark the milestone.

Please visit www.crickettas.com.au in the coming weeks and look out for the 150th Anniversary Logo tab for further information.

Cricket Tasmania staff congregate at the new Western Entrance in April 2015.


WACA Membership team soar


WACA Membership team soar

Danny Henderson was collecting “expired pigeons” when the WACA agreed to sponsor his visa to remain and work in Australia and the US-import has since repaid the faith by helping the Perth Scorchers record the biggest membership uplift in the country.

Danny is one of the three-person WACA Membership team working under General Manager – Membership Grant White and the department last season increased its Scorchers base from 2200 in BBL|03 to more than 4000 in BBL|04, a year-on-year increase that was unmatched across all other clubs.

It was an impressive result, particularly considering Henderson hails from South Carolina, US – a city not known for its passionate cricket following.

“I first learnt cricket when I came to Australia on Uni-Exchange back in 2008,” Henderson said.

“My housemates – all Aussie – in North Queensland taught me the ins and outs of the game and I’ve been hooked ever since. I grew up playing baseball and golf, and I always thought cricket was sort of a good marriage of the two.

“Obviously, part of my cricket education process back in Townsville was to learn what distinguished each ground and the two lessons that stood out the most were: you could watch a Test match from an inflatable pool at Adelaide Oval and the Aussies never lost at the WACA Ground.  

“When I came to Perth to visit a friend, I immediately loved the town and figured I had nothing to lose in asking if any positions were available at the WACA.

“I literally knocked on the door at reception and begged for our HR Manager’s email address and I was lucky that Grant White gave me a chance to do some odd jobs around the Members enclosure in the lead-up to an England v WA Tour Match.

“In my first week as a casual, I was asked to remove a few ‘expired’ pigeons that had come to their final resting place behind some seats in our upper deck.

“So from that moment to now, being sponsored has been a very positive development in my career.”

WACA has a strong focus on becoming the leaders in Australian Cricket, whether it’s a player, coach, or administrator. Word has it that it makes for a contagious environment to work in.

Danny Henderson // WACA Cricket



Cricket NSW set for "Good to Great


Cricket NSW set for "Good to Great"

2014/15 was one of the biggest seasons in the history of NSW Cricket. However with the new summer approaching quickly, staff from all over the state gathered in Manly recently for a two day summit designed to take the country's most populous state from “Good to Great".  

“There were two aims of this conference,” said Chief Executive Andrew Jones.

“One was recognise the achievements of all of the staff at Cricket NSW over the past couple of years, and particularly the season we’ve just had. This was the biggest season ever and in some ways, it was also the most difficult.

“Our second aim was to reset the aspirations of Cricket NSW. Everyone had a voice so we said ‘Ok, we’ve done that. Where do we go from here?’”

Much of the conference will be spent developing strategy and culture, with development also a big focus of the two days.

Staff had the opportunity to hear from and ask questions of the likes of Olympic medallist Jacqui Cooper, as well as a panel of peers including former NSW and Australia batter (now Cricket NSW’s Female Pathway Manager) Leah Poulton, current Blues spinner Stephen O’Keefe, and Sydney Sixers General Manager Dominic Remond.

“We felt that staff would be interested, from a career planning perspective, in learning how some of our people got from where they started to where they are now. Whether you work on or off the field, it is important to understand how top class professionals think about high performance and what it takes to be successful,” explained Jones.

Enjoyment is one of Cricket NSW’s five key values and there was plenty of this over the course of the two days. The evening function was a fancy dress theme with staff asked to come as something/someone ‘great’.

So far costumes resembling Hulk Hogan, Harry Potter, Shane Warne and a Great White Shark have started arriving at Cricket NSW headquarters in Moore Park, with one staff member dressed as a slice of bread.

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Great Britain, a Great White Shark and Johnny Rotten will make an appearance at Cricket NSW’s Fancy Dress night celebrating Greatness


Staff volunteer with The Alannah and Madeline Foundation


CA staff volunteer at The Alannah and Madeline Foundation

Eight of our staff members have assisted in packing more than 400 “Buddy Bags” for children in emergency accommodation.

Alongside Cricket Care’s official charity partner The Alannah and Madeline Foundation, our volunteers spent time in the foundation’s South Melbourne offices learning the history of AMF and then packing backpacks for kids aged 0-16.

AMF undertakes incredible work protecting children from violence and its devastating impacts each year.

The Buddy Bags program was established in 2007 and directly supports children going to youth shelters and include necessities such as clothing, face washers, towels, toothpaste and comfort items such as a book and teddy bear.

Managed by Communications and Community Relations Advisor Seb Kipman, the project was just one of the many joint ventures between Cricket Australia and its newest charity partner.

Children make up 27 per cent of the homeless in Australia, with over 70,000 youth assisted in a two year period.

The experience had a profound effect on our volunteers with some reflecting on the day below:

LAUREN COOPER (Operations):

“The fact that our bags are going to be sent out to refuges to be used within the week is frightening but also very real of what is going on in society.”

ANGELA LOGAN (Communications):

“It definitely made me reflect on how lucky I am and how we have a duty to help and support others who may not be as fortunate as us.”

JOSLYN TITUS (Team Performance):

For the kids who receive the buddy bags it means there's someone out there who cares for them. I really hope that CA staff can get to volunteer at AMF as often as possible. It's certainly worth it.”

ANDREW BABER (Communications):

“Being able to do something that brings a little bit of happiness to kids that are doing it tough was special and it certainly made me recognise my good fortune and put into context some of the trivialities that we focus on in day to day life.”

Congratulations to the staff who volunteered: Angela Logan (Communications), Lauren Cooper (Operations), Aaron Pereira (Communcations), Andrew Baber (Communications), Paul Bosher (Business), Joslyn Titus (Team Performance), Laura Jolly (Digital) and Seb Kipman (Communications).

For more information, contact Seb Kipman.

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Penny Archer hits 15 years of cricket


Penny Archer hits 15 years of cricket

Fifteen years is a short lifetime. In the case of Cricket Australia, back then it was known as Australian Cricket Board, the 30 or so employees worked from a smaller version of the Cricket Victoria offices down the road, and our now long standing CEO was General Manager Commercial, which oversaw our finance function.

Working in a small organisation with less resources generally means you have more responsibility and breadth of what you’re able to work on than in other businesses.

Designing your own career is the key to development and maintaining an enjoyable time working, for as long as you choose to. Happy employees are usually high performing ones, the result impacting both career and home life. 

Cricket Australia’s Event Manager Penny Archer said there are obvious benefits of working in cricket.

“We tend to hire ambitious people who are all here for the same reason – sport is exciting and everyone wants to do their best to put on an entertaining game for all to enjoy,” Penny said.

“Although, like anything, there’s always more that we can do as a business to improve and innovate, the fun, energetic and driven people I work with are the things that have remained consistent over the years” Penny added.

Penny recalled examples of how CA has been the launch pad for previous colleagues to go onto do amazing things in other organisations– some even returning to us again years later, such as Anthony Everard, Senior Manager - Big Bash League and Jonathan Rose, Senior Manager Communications.

“It’s also offered me the support to have three children during my time here. How many people are fortunate enough to have careers that offer the perfect blend of coordinating the Cricket World Cup event with the thrill of raising a family?” Penny added.

“It’s a balancing act but as much about honest and open conversations with your manager about what your priorities are as it is about how to be your best at work. “

Penny is a great example of how continued diligence and reliability creates strong working relationships and opportunities. Even as lifestyle and interests change, good timing and the right circumstances and support can eventuate in a career that works perfectly for you.

If you think Cricket Australia staff would benefit from hearing more career success stories, nominate a colleague at Cricket Communications 

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Australian Cricket's ANZAC Heroes


Australian Cricket's ANZAC Heroes

As Australia commemorated ANZAC day last month, we paid tribute to cricket’s own ANZAC legend, Tibby Cotter.

Cotter was a talented cricketer for our national team, who also served his country on the battlefields of Europe in World War 1.

By age 17, Cotter was a promising cricketer when he was selected to play for New South Wales. He moved on to play for the national team at only 20 years old – at the time one of the youngest to represent Australia.

By his mid-20s, an unfortunate board disagreement saw Cotter leave the cricketing system prematurely. It was a short lived professional cricket career for such a talented player, but only the beginning of the next inspiring chapter of his life.

Before too long, Cotter joined the Australian Imperial Force, serving in Gallipoli, where it seems his teamwork on the cricket field extended to his loyalty and mateship for his fellow soldiers on the battlefield.

Tragically, Cotter suffered a gunshot wound whilst trying to save another wounded solider. He was one of 60,000 Australian soldiers to have died in World War I, and laid to rest a hero.

To commemorate his legacy, the Albert 'Tibby' Cotter Walkway officially opened in February this year, connecting the ANZAC Parade to the SCG.

A further example of our ANZAC spirit was captured in this video produced by Cat Ellis that captures our Cricket Cares work with Camp Gallipoli in Brisbane. Darren Lehmann and Ryan Harris took part and were great ambassadors for cricket. 



Cricket Cares charity partners on show


Cricket Cares charity partners on show

Through its official charity partners, Movember, the Alannah and Madeline Foundation, and the McGrath Foundation, individual player charities, disaster relief efforts, and broader community work, the Cricket Cares program uses cricket to create change in our community.

Watch this inspirational video, produced by Cat Ellis, which was featured on cricket.com.au. It’s a great example of the power of cricket uniting our nation.


CA staff member has the VicSpirit to thrive


CA staff member has the VicSpirit to thrive

You may have seen a familiar face on TV recently as part of the Commonwealth Bank VicSpirit line up. Briana Binch is one of three first class cricketers working at Cricket Australia.

Briana got her first taste of cricket like many others, on makeshift backyard and beach pitches before transitioning into competitive cricket in an Under 10’s boys team. By age 11, she was playing for Essendon Maribyrnong Park where she’s stayed for almost twenty years.

Game Development Programs Officer Briana Binch explains how juggling club and state responsibilities prepared her for working life.

“With limited volunteers, most players will be involved in the off field responsibilities at a club, whether that’s coaching, being on the committee, selection, captaining and coordinating an in2CRICKET program. I have done all of these at some point or another” said Briana.

Armed with insight of a participant’s experience Briana looks after the Indoor National Championships and World Series events, the Imparja Cup, the CBA Australian Country Cricket Championships as well the inaugural All Abilities Championships.

With 22 per cent of cricketers being female, Briana describes the Women’s Big Bash League as a great concept that has the potential to have a lasting impact on the game.

“It will certainly benefit the game in the longer term. With the introduction of contracts, access to facilities and opportunities available to young girls will then this could one day become a viable career path for females.” 

It’s a great time to be involved in cricket at a turning point for the game. Whilst we anticipate the promising on field performances of our workmates, they plot to entice our novices to give the game a go.

If you want to nominate a colleague for their hidden talent, contact Cricket Communications.

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Outdoor kids play Indoor Cricket too


Outdoor kids play Indoor Cricket too

The days of cricket being an exclusively summer sport are gone with the rapid rise of Indoor Cricket.

More than 160,000 Australians are currently enjoying the fast paced, all abilities format of the game.

For those who don’t know the ins-and-outs of Indoor Cricket, a “pair” faces four overs and continues to bat even if dismissed with each section of the nets worth a certain amount.

Extremely prominent throughout the 1980s and 1990s, some of Australia’s future stars plied their trade on the carpet alongside the grass including Mark and Steve Waugh.

It was even broadcast on the old “Channel 2” for a nationwide audience and developed quite a cult following.

Cricket Australia’s Indoor Cricket Manager Paul Milo has done a lot of work behind the scenes on the upcoming National and World Championships to be held across Sydney and Brisbane over the next three months.

The Championships will see identified talent compete in the Masters, Opens and Junior Tournaments culminating in the Junior World Championships in September.

For more information, contact Paul Milo and watch the video below to see some of your favourite players reminisce about their journey from Indoor to the Baggy Green.


Belinda Clark goes to Harvard


Belinda Clark goes to Harvard

Belinda Clark, Senior Manager, Team Performance, has had a long history with cricket – in fact this legend on the field was also recently granted an honorary life membership of the MCC in a tribute to her record-breaking career. 

Belinda ‘s success has also included a past life working as a Physiotherapist, to her roles as Executive Officer and Women’s Cricket Operations Manager with Cricket Australia prior to her current role focussing on Australian elite teams and the development of the Bupa NCC.  

She is currently responsible for eighteen staff, the development and delivery of longer term athlete development programs, grass roots cricket talent programs, Bupa NCC Facility and financial management. 

As a result of Belinda’s annual performance review, she identified an interest in broadening her understanding outside her core area of expertise in order to continue developing innovative solutions in competitive and fast changing sporting industry.

Following an application process, Belinda has been accepted and is currently attending an eight week Harvard School of Executive Education program in the USA.

Cricket Australia’s sponsorship of this executive development opportunity is in recognition of Belinda’s huge contribution to the development of the game over the last ten years, particularly in her ICC Women’s Committee member capacity where she influences countries that can be culturally adverse to females working in leadership roles. Sharing her broadened understanding of global trends will be a valuable input into changes required to be at the forefront of our sport. 

A great foundation has been set for our people to develop their own careers through review processes with their managers based on performance achievements and interest areas. It’s great to see one of our leaders demonstrating its benefit.  

Belinda returns to Bupa NCC 1 June 2015.

For further information on development opportunities, speak to your manager or Louise Lee 

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Behind the scenes of scheduling


Behind the scenes of scheduling

Last season there were officially 72 versions of the schedule and countless amounts this year. It’s also often planned up to ten years in advance. It’s fair to say scheduling of the cricket season isn’t as easy as the fixture makes it look.

Scheduling is our most strategic lever to engage fans and grow the game. It touches every part of our business. 

Cricket Australia’s Senior Manager Strategy & Scheduling Sachin Kumar said there are obvious benefits of getting a schedule just right.

“It’s no secret that our business makes money by selling media rights to broadcasters for both international and domestic matches,” Sachin said.

“After the ICC determines which countries will host various world events, we work with other countries to secure tours well in advance. This takes into account the best time to play in each country, reciprocity where possible and creating a consistent frequency of tours” Sachin added.

It’s as much about negotiating and relationship building as it is about putting the pieces of a huge cricket jigsaw puzzle together.  

There is a united effort across Australian Cricket to coordinate the current schedule whilst planning the next. This involves Team Performance, International Cricket & Events, Big Bash League, Media rights and Government teams to leverage Marketing’s research to move cricket closer to becoming Australia’s favourite sport. 

Alignment of international matches and the domestic season is also a priority. The change two seasons ago of Matador Cup being played in one consecutive block of time rather than interspersed between Sheffield Shield matches is a good example of how a change in approach can create more time for players and cost efficiencies.

The Strategy team is accustomed to face further refining of the schedule and challenges to solve for.

Regardless of the challenges, Australian Cricket always get there in the end. Every year the focus is to learn and improve on the last season. The Strategy team continues to turn such a complicated exercise into an easy-to-understand fixture that Media, Communications & Marketing package up neatly for our fans.

For further information, contact Sachin Kumar


New Commonwealth Bank Southern Stars Head Coach


New Commonwealth Bank Southern Stars Head Coach

Last month, Cathryn announced that, as of June, she will transition from her role of Head Coach for the Commonwealth Bank Southern Stars to her next challenge, which will see her focus her efforts on coaching at the elite youth level.    

She has made an incredible contribution to cricket, coaching the Southern Stars since 2012, and overseeing three successful ICC World Cup titles.

“It’s been a very rewarding period, helping develop a group of exciting young players and seeing them achieve great things on the world stage. We have had some time since our last international commitments and it has given me time to reflect on what I think is best for the players to continue their success. Right now I believe that a coach with a fresh approach will help them continue their rise and reach their potential,” Cathryn said.

CEO James Sutherland described Cathryn as “an all-time great of women’s cricket and her achievements as a coach have only enhanced her legacy”.

Former Queensland and Victoria batsman Matthew Mott will assume the reigns as the new Head Coach and will be based in at the Bupa National Cricket Centre in Brisbane.

A seasoned coach in Australia, England and India, Matthew guided New South Wales to a Sheffield Shield victory, Big Bash Twenty20 title and Champions League Twenty20. He has also worked as an Assistant Coach at an international level, recently finishing a stint with Ireland for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015.

Executive General Manager of Team Performance Pat Howard said, “We are very pleased to have secured Matthew Mott for such an important role within Australian cricket.

“He has extensive experience across a number of countries in all formats, and has a recognised ability to develop players.”

Speaking about his new role Matthew said, “It really is an exciting time for women’s cricket in Australia, so to have the chance to build on the team’s already impressive playing record is something I’m looking forward to, particularly as we head into the 2015 Women’s Ashes Series.”

Matthew commenced his role this week and will work with the team to ensure a strong preparation for the upcoming 2015 Women’s Ashes Series in the UK.

We wish Cathryn and Matthew all the best in their new roles.


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Award winner at Victorian Sports Industry awards


Award winner at Victorian Sports Industry awards

James Sutherland, was awarded the Sports Administrator Award in light of his leadership through the tragedy of Phillip Hughes' death as well as the development of cricket throughout his time as CEO of Cricket Australia.

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Watch James' acceptance speech below (from 9:00m - originally published on MySportLive):



ICC Cricket World Cup Champions


ICC Cricket World Cup Champions

It seems we were counting down to the ICC Cricket World Cup only a short time ago. In fact, it was just over six weeks. The once in a generation privilege to co-host the event has concluded in a fairy tale fashion with Australia winning the tournament – a fitting finish for captain Michael Clarke, who announced his retirement from ODI cricket. 

CEO James Sutherland said, “From the time that he burst onto the scene as an exciting 21-year old way back in January 2003, he was always destined for great things.

While his decision comes as something of a surprise, Michael leaves one-day cricket on his own terms, aiming to finish on an absolute high, in front of a packed MCG as a possible World Cup-winning captain. That’s very special.”

CWC2015 has been the biggest sporting event in Australia since the 2000 Sydney Olympics - 1,016,421 people attended the 49 matches over 44 days across Australia and New Zealand. 

Australian Cricket worked together to “think big and act accordingly” looking for every opportunity to demonstrate our commitment to diversity and inclusion, celebrate the multi-cultural nature of this event, and further reinforce our status as Australia’s favourite sport and a sport for all Australians. From early morning calls, seven days per week, to online reporting throughout the night, to lighting up Australian landmarks in green and gold, to all the heavy lifting in the background that make matches run seamlessly. We really did work as one team.

Huge crowds, unprecedented social media activity and anticipated global television audience of more than a billion for the tournament has made it the most popular Cricket World Cup ever. 

Watch this inspirational video produced by our Digital team, which was featured on cricket.com.au, where they also streamed the celebration event at Federation Square on 30 March.

Whilst we are still leveraging the Cricket World Cup via media coverage and personalised team photos signed by Darren Lehmann, we have an incredible opportunity to create a lasting legacy for our sport.

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Camp Gallipoli Ticket Offer


Camp Gallipoli Ticket Offer

Camp Gallipoli is a once in a lifetime opportunity for all Australians and New Zealanders to come together on the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli to sleep out under the same stars as the original Anzacs did 100 years ago.

In a series of historic locations around Australia and New Zealand, families, schools and community groups are invited to join in a special night of remembrance, entertainment, mateship and the birth of that special Aussie & Kiwi ANZAC spirit. Each venue will have spaces set aside for camping using swags, just like the Diggers did. There will be entertainment, special guests, movies, documentaries, great food options and a very special Dawn Service on Anzac day itself. 

Events will be held at the following venues: 

• Adelaide – Morphettville Racecourse 

• Brisbane – Brisbane Showground 

• Melbourne –The Royal Melbourne Showgrounds 

• Sydney – Centennial Park 

• Perth – Ascot Racecourse  

• Hobart – The Hutchins School 

• Auckland – Ellerslie Racecourse

Proceeds from ticket sales for each Camp Gallipoli event will go to RSL and Legacy Australia. Visit www.campgallipoli.com.au for more information   

Receive a special discount by using the code ‘CRICKET’ when purchasing your tickets on Ticketek.

Watch below:

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Cricket Smart Growth


Cricket Smart Growth

The biggest event since the Sydney Olympics has arrived, and we have the honour of co-hosting it.

With an audience of over 2 billion watching in their homes and over 825,000 tickets sold for the ICC Cricket World Cup – that’s a lot of cheering! Starting with our own Cricket Australia teams, we encourage as many Australians as possible to get behind our team to Go Gold.

Having the ICC Cricket World Cup in our own backyard has been a long awaited honour, but has also inspired some innovative work from behind the scenes of cricket too. Last July we launched the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 Legacy project ‘Cricket Smart’ with the help of Australian Head Coach Darren Lehman, and of course his son Ethan. 

Cricket Smart uses the theme of cricket and the World Cup itself to teach six core and emerging subjects including science, maths, history and design in a fun and engaging way aligned with the Australian curriculum. 

The ready-made unit plans are available free for schools to download on the Cricket Smart website www.cricketsmart.cricket.com.au and fast captured the support and interest of schools across the country. More than 500 teachers signed up to Cricket Smart within a week of the launch, and this has grown significantly to over 2000 schools across Australia. Considering there are around 10,000 schools in Australia, 2,000 of them signing up is a substantial uptake.

Around 20 per cent of the schools who have signed up for the program are completely new to cricket having had no exposure to cricket programs such as MILO in2Cricket or MILO T20 Blast School Cups. This program gets these schools participating in cricket programs.

Andrew Ingleton, Executive General Manager, Game & Market Development, said “What an amazing achievement! By connecting with school-aged kids and helping them learn through a fun activity, we should be proud of the impact cricket has on young lives. “

“I’d like to congratulate everyone across Cricket Australia and the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 who has been involved in this project, in particular Nick Pryde who has lead this initiative. “ said Andrew

Results are indicating that school teachers aren’t the only advocates of these types of learning programs. With children participating in cricket activities as part of their school curriculum, there is increased likelihood of the interest of children participating in the sport, a key driver of what we are here to deliver for our game. 

For further information, contact Andrew Ingleton


mk

Students and Teachers alike are learning through Cricket // Herald Sun


Coach Mentor Program


Coach Mentor Program

Australian Cricket is committed to identifying talent, improving the quality and elevating the status of coaching in Australia. Without it, our coaches coach our players, but who coaches our coaches?  Here’s where our new mentoring program comes into play. 

Darren Holder, High Performance Coach Development Manager, said “The focus of our coach mentoring is providing support, expertise and experience for coaches to raise standards and ensure high quality environments are available to all players involved in our talent pathway. And of course that we are producing the best Coaches.”

Mentor Coaches are being provided at each of the Youth Championships along with Australian Country Cricket Championships (ACCC) & Imparja Cup. “They often come from team sports other than cricket and present opportunities for High Performance Coaches to learn broader best practice coaching.” Darren said.

Through support offered across Australian Cricket, Team Performance generates a positive effect on coach development outcomes, benefiting coaches and, indirectly, the players as well. For example, the WACA engaged Michael Dighton as a specialist consultant to work with the WA Country Coaches and Squad in their preparation for the ACCC. It was obvious that strong relationships had been formed and all the players were very familiar and comfortable with Michael’s direct involvement in Bendigo as a part of the Australian Cricketer’s Association program. Similarly Cricket Tasmania has utilised Tasmanian Tigers’ Luke Butterworth’s skills and expertise across their youth programs as they prepare for each of the Championships.

Cricket Australia is committed to providing agreed financial support to facilitate this local State and Territory mentor coaching and will provide access to an allocation of funds for their local program.  

For further information read here or contact Darren Holder

 mk

Coaches have been called upon to provide guidance to future leaders in the sport // Getty Images


Have you heard of Blowfly Cricket?


Have you heard of Blowfly Cricket?

This January, 30,000 fans at the SCG cheered on Autistic children as they played a special brand of cricket.

The Blowfly Cricket program gives kids with autism, Down syndrome and cerebral palsy the chance to play competitive sport. Watch this inspirational video, provided by Cat Ellis, which was featured on ABC TV and cricket.com.au

It’s a great example of cricket’s work as a sport for all.

mk

Blowfly Cricket is a form of the game played by kids with special needs


Cricket People


Cricket People

Late last year you provided feedback on how to make Cricket Australia a better place to work. There were four key areas to target – people focus, career development, feedback, recognition and communication.

Some common themes of sharing, collaboration, the need for connection and breaking down silos rang true in the responses provided. Some new initiatives have been developed as a result:

• A Cricket Australia all staff e-newsletter (with scope to extend to Australian Cricket) to better share what is happening across our business, and a monthly forum for sharing the great work being accomplished

• Corporate emails will be easily identifiable via a Cricket Communications address

• Pop up learning sessions, covering a range of topics on skills and product training, guest speakers and whatever else your hosts across CA nominate are of interest to you. 

• Profiles of new starters, people who have changed roles and key players to better understand what other departments are working on.

• A refreshed all staff meeting schedule and format, following your feedback from the November session

The leadership team has also committed to a number of initiatives designed to address unique concerns raised by each function in their survey results. These have been shared on a team by team basis. Each department’s leadership team will work with their people on initiatives to address those concerns. The Human Resources team will facilitate addressing the concerns which are common across all of Cricket Australia, so watch this space! 

Improved communication requires two-way conversation, so your on-going feedback and ideas are welcomed at Cricket.Communications@cricket.com.au.

mk

A few of our Cricket People


New Website Strategy Delivers


New Website Strategy Delivers

In November, the Digital team launched a new website strategy for Cricket Australia.

After consulting with our fans, cricketaustralia.com.au was created to house organisational information and give more space to the great stories about cricket in the community.

Our existing site, cricket.com.au was revamped to better reflect how fans wanted to use it – as a home for the latest cricket news, scores and videos. Two months on, it’s time to share how the cricket community has reacted to the changes. In December, according to the official industry benchmark Nieslen, the Cricket Australia network was the No.1 sports publisher in Australia, ahead of the ESPN network of sites, The Sydney Morning Herald, news.com.au and Fox Sports to name a few. 

Finn Bradshaw, Head of Digital, said “We have been blown away by how strongly the fans have responded to the changes.” Nielsen results showed that more than 1 million Australians visited our sites in December. That’s a 46% increase from December 2013 (when we won back the Ashes!), and a 246% increase from December 2012. “We’re also really pleased with the engagement rates – people aren’t just coming for one thing and leaving. And the audience using the Cricket Australia Live app continues to grow strongly.. ” said Finn Bradshaw. Video continues to be an area of focus, and it’s pleasing to see that video views in December increased by 50% to more than 6.6 million. The most popular one was of Glenn Maxwell’s ill-advised leave in the Big Bash. It’s now Cricket Australia’s most watched video ever. 

Breaking news is also a big traffic driver. Our most popular stories in December included MS Dhoni’s shock retirement from Tests and Ashton Agar’s call up to the Test squad. Results indicated that a large amount of cricket audience engagement occurs via social media, of which there will be a continuing strong presence. For further information, contact Finn Bradshaw.

mk

Cricket Australia's new website strategy a hit with consumers


Corporate Hospitality and Group Ticketing Launch


Corporate Hospitality and Group Ticketing Launch

The 2014/15 cricket season saw the launch of new Cricket Australia Corporate Hospitality and Group Ticketing programs. Under cricket’s new Financial Model, we have taken on selling and running Corporate Hospitality functions at all International Cricket Matches, in order to create a consistent hospitality program across the six different venues. 

The active selling of tickets to International cricket for large groups is new to cricket has allowed more personalised options for company social clubs, cricket/sporting clubs, family and friends. The groups deal directly with a Cricket Australia representative based in various states, assisting with sales, questions and changes throughout the booking process. The personalised service has made taking guests to the cricket an easy and enjoyable experience. Michael da Costa-Alves, Head of Commercial Sales & Partnerships, said his team brought together talented people with experience in sales, customer service and event delivery. “We have also relied heavily on other departments, State Associations and external vendors who have all been integral in the programs’ launch.” 

The CA National Hospitality team has been focused on creating and selling a new and exciting suite of world class products to provide customers with an amazing day at the cricket, encouraging them to return in future seasons. As brand ambassadors, the team have been working hard to develop enduring relationships with important clients which are critical for the sustainability of the program. Chris Loftus-Hills, Senior Manager International Cricket Events, added “Together with the Sales Managers, the event activation team have very quickly created effective relationships with venues and suppliers to enable a high standard of delivery in the first year. As these premium products develop and the client base strengthens the program will only get stronger in coming seasons. “ Many people have been involved in the success of the Sales and Event initiatives. 

The team thanks the Cricket Australia family and State Associations for their time and work involved - from freeing up resources to building and maintaining a Customer relationship management system. A strong foundation has been set to build on next season and for many to come. For further information, contact Christian Cummins.

mk

Taking guests to the cricket is an easy and enjoyable experience // Getty Images


Cricket Smart Growth


Cricket Smart Growth

The biggest event since the Sydney Olympics has arrived, and we have the honour of co-hosting it.

With an audience of over 2 billion watching in their homes and over 825,000 tickets sold for the ICC Cricket World Cup – that’s a lot of cheering! Starting with our own Cricket Australia teams, we encourage as many Australians as possible to get behind our team to Go Gold.

Having the ICC Cricket World Cup in our own backyard has been a long awaited honour, but has also inspired some innovative work from behind the scenes of cricket too. Last July we launched the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 Legacy project ‘Cricket Smart’ with the help of Australian Head Coach Darren Lehman, and of course his son Ethan. 

Cricket Smart uses the theme of cricket and the World Cup itself to teach six core and emerging subjects including science, maths, history and design in a fun and engaging way aligned with the Australian curriculum. 

The ready-made unit plans are available free for schools to download on the Cricket Smart website www.cricketsmart.cricket.com.au and fast captured the support and interest of schools across the country. More than 500 teachers signed up to Cricket Smart within a week of the launch, and this has grown significantly to over 2000 schools across Australia. Considering there are around 10,000 schools in Australia, 2,000 of them signing up is a substantial uptake.

Around 20 per cent of the schools who have signed up for the program are completely new to cricket having had no exposure to cricket programs such as MILO in2Cricket or MILO T20 Blast School Cups. This program gets these schools participating in cricket programs.

Andrew Ingleton, Executive General Manager, Game & Market Development, said “What an amazing achievement! By connecting with school-aged kids and helping them learn through a fun activity, we should be proud of the impact cricket has on young lives. “

“I’d like to congratulate everyone across Cricket Australia and the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 who has been involved in this project, in particular Nick Pryde who has lead this initiative. “ said Andrew

Results are indicating that school teachers aren’t the only advocates of these types of learning programs. With children participating in cricket activities as part of their school curriculum, there is increased likelihood of the interest of children participating in the sport, a key driver of what we are here to deliver for our game. 

For further information, contact Andrew Ingleton


Cricket Smart Growth


Cricket Smart Growth

The biggest event since the Sydney Olympics has arrived, and we have the honour of co-hosting it.

With an audience of over 2 billion watching in their homes and over 825,000 tickets sold for the ICC Cricket World Cup – that’s a lot of cheering! Starting with our own Cricket Australia teams, we encourage as many Australians as possible to get behind our team to Go Gold.

Having the ICC Cricket World Cup in our own backyard has been a long awaited honour, but has also inspired some innovative work from behind the scenes of cricket too. Last July we launched the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 Legacy project ‘Cricket Smart’ with the help of Australian Head Coach Darren Lehman, and of course his son Ethan. 

Cricket Smart uses the theme of cricket and the World Cup itself to teach six core and emerging subjects including science, maths, history and design in a fun and engaging way aligned with the Australian curriculum. 

The ready-made unit plans are available free for schools to download on the Cricket Smart website www.cricketsmart.cricket.com.au and fast captured the support and interest of schools across the country. More than 500 teachers signed up to Cricket Smart within a week of the launch, and this has grown significantly to over 2000 schools across Australia. Considering there are around 10,000 schools in Australia, 2,000 of them signing up is a substantial uptake.

Around 20 per cent of the schools who have signed up for the program are completely new to cricket having had no exposure to cricket programs such as MILO in2Cricket or MILO T20 Blast School Cups. This program gets these schools participating in cricket programs.

Andrew Ingleton, Executive General Manager, Game & Market Development, said “What an amazing achievement! By connecting with school-aged kids and helping them learn through a fun activity, we should be proud of the impact cricket has on young lives. “

“I’d like to congratulate everyone across Cricket Australia and the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 who has been involved in this project, in particular Nick Pryde who has lead this initiative. “ said Andrew

Results are indicating that school teachers aren’t the only advocates of these types of learning programs. With children participating in cricket activities as part of their school curriculum, there is increased likelihood of the interest of children participating in the sport, a key driver of what we are here to deliver for our game. 

For further information, contact Andrew Ingleton


Cricket Smart Growth


Cricket Smart Growth

The biggest event since the Sydney Olympics has arrived, and we have the honour of co-hosting it.

With an audience of over 2 billion watching in their homes and over 825,000 tickets sold for the ICC Cricket World Cup – that’s a lot of cheering! Starting with our own Cricket Australia teams, we encourage as many Australians as possible to get behind our team to Go Gold.

Having the ICC Cricket World Cup in our own backyard has been a long awaited honour, but has also inspired some innovative work from behind the scenes of cricket too. Last July we launched the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 Legacy project ‘Cricket Smart’ with the help of Australian Head Coach Darren Lehman, and of course his son Ethan. 

Cricket Smart uses the theme of cricket and the World Cup itself to teach six core and emerging subjects including science, maths, history and design in a fun and engaging way aligned with the Australian curriculum. 

The ready-made unit plans are available free for schools to download on the Cricket Smart website www.cricketsmart.cricket.com.au and fast captured the support and interest of schools across the country. More than 500 teachers signed up to Cricket Smart within a week of the launch, and this has grown significantly to over 2000 schools across Australia. Considering there are around 10,000 schools in Australia, 2,000 of them signing up is a substantial uptake.

Around 20 per cent of the schools who have signed up for the program are completely new to cricket having had no exposure to cricket programs such as MILO in2Cricket or MILO T20 Blast School Cups. This program gets these schools participating in cricket programs.

Andrew Ingleton, Executive General Manager, Game & Market Development, said “What an amazing achievement! By connecting with school-aged kids and helping them learn through a fun activity, we should be proud of the impact cricket has on young lives. “

“I’d like to congratulate everyone across Cricket Australia and the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 who has been involved in this project, in particular Nick Pryde who has lead this initiative. “ said Andrew

Results are indicating that school teachers aren’t the only advocates of these types of learning programs. With children participating in cricket activities as part of their school curriculum, there is increased likelihood of the interest of children participating in the sport, a key driver of what we are here to deliver for our game. 

For further information, contact Andrew Ingleton


Cricket Smart Growth


Cricket Smart Growth

The biggest event since the Sydney Olympics has arrived, and we have the honour of co-hosting it.

With an audience of over 2 billion watching in their homes and over 825,000 tickets sold for the ICC Cricket World Cup – that’s a lot of cheering! Starting with our own Cricket Australia teams, we encourage as many Australians as possible to get behind our team to Go Gold.

Having the ICC Cricket World Cup in our own backyard has been a long awaited honour, but has also inspired some innovative work from behind the scenes of cricket too. Last July we launched the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 Legacy project ‘Cricket Smart’ with the help of Australian Head Coach Darren Lehman, and of course his son Ethan. 

Cricket Smart uses the theme of cricket and the World Cup itself to teach six core and emerging subjects including science, maths, history and design in a fun and engaging way aligned with the Australian curriculum. 

The ready-made unit plans are available free for schools to download on the Cricket Smart website www.cricketsmart.cricket.com.au and fast captured the support and interest of schools across the country. More than 500 teachers signed up to Cricket Smart within a week of the launch, and this has grown significantly to over 2000 schools across Australia. Considering there are around 10,000 schools in Australia, 2,000 of them signing up is a substantial uptake.

Around 20 per cent of the schools who have signed up for the program are completely new to cricket having had no exposure to cricket programs such as MILO in2Cricket or MILO T20 Blast School Cups. This program gets these schools participating in cricket programs.

Andrew Ingleton, Executive General Manager, Game & Market Development, said “What an amazing achievement! By connecting with school-aged kids and helping them learn through a fun activity, we should be proud of the impact cricket has on young lives. “

“I’d like to congratulate everyone across Cricket Australia and the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 who has been involved in this project, in particular Nick Pryde who has lead this initiative. “ said Andrew

Results are indicating that school teachers aren’t the only advocates of these types of learning programs. With children participating in cricket activities as part of their school curriculum, there is increased likelihood of the interest of children participating in the sport, a key driver of what we are here to deliver for our game. 

For further information, contact Andrew Ingleton


Cricket Smart Growth


Cricket Smart Growth

The biggest event since the Sydney Olympics has arrived, and we have the honour of co-hosting it.

With an audience of over 2 billion watching in their homes and over 825,000 tickets sold for the ICC Cricket World Cup – that’s a lot of cheering! Starting with our own Cricket Australia teams, we encourage as many Australians as possible to get behind our team to Go Gold.

Having the ICC Cricket World Cup in our own backyard has been a long awaited honour, but has also inspired some innovative work from behind the scenes of cricket too. Last July we launched the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 Legacy project ‘Cricket Smart’ with the help of Australian Head Coach Darren Lehman, and of course his son Ethan. 

Cricket Smart uses the theme of cricket and the World Cup itself to teach six core and emerging subjects including science, maths, history and design in a fun and engaging way aligned with the Australian curriculum. 

The ready-made unit plans are available free for schools to download on the Cricket Smart website www.cricketsmart.cricket.com.au and fast captured the support and interest of schools across the country. More than 500 teachers signed up to Cricket Smart within a week of the launch, and this has grown significantly to over 2000 schools across Australia. Considering there are around 10,000 schools in Australia, 2,000 of them signing up is a substantial uptake.

Around 20 per cent of the schools who have signed up for the program are completely new to cricket having had no exposure to cricket programs such as MILO in2Cricket or MILO T20 Blast School Cups. This program gets these schools participating in cricket programs.

Andrew Ingleton, Executive General Manager, Game & Market Development, said “What an amazing achievement! By connecting with school-aged kids and helping them learn through a fun activity, we should be proud of the impact cricket has on young lives. “

“I’d like to congratulate everyone across Cricket Australia and the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 who has been involved in this project, in particular Nick Pryde who has lead this initiative. “ said Andrew

Results are indicating that school teachers aren’t the only advocates of these types of learning programs. With children participating in cricket activities as part of their school curriculum, there is increased likelihood of the interest of children participating in the sport, a key driver of what we are here to deliver for our game. 

For further information, contact Andrew Ingleton


Take on Shane Warne


Take on Shane Warne

MCG's National Sports Museum is the home of Australia’s greatest showcase of our pride and joy, sport. It’s where cricket honors its best in the hall of fame and Shane Warne’s, ‘Pepper’s Ghost’, a semi-transparent illusion, much like a hologram, resides.

Whether you are just visiting or working across the road, why not take advantage of the benefits of being Cricket Australia staff with a discounted offer and potential glory of batting against a virtual Shane Warne at the National Sports Museum‘s King of Spin Oculus Rift Experience.

The lightweight virtual reality headset provides the player with 360-degree views, allowing them to seamlessly look around the stadium as if they were out on the MCG pitch in real life. Every small movement is tracked in real time, creating a natural and intuitive experience.

Open to everyone for $10, as Cricket Australia staff, just show your security pass for free entry (limit twice per year). Here is your chance to take on Warnie, step up to the crease and have a go exclusively at the National Sports Museum via Gate 3 at the MCG until April 18.

MCG's National Sports Museum is the home of Australia’s greatest showcase of our pride and joy, sport. It’s where cricket honors its best in the hall of fame and Shane Warne’s, ‘Pepper’s Ghost’, a semi-transparent illusion, much like a hologram, resides.

Whether you are just visiting or working across the road, why not take advantage of the benefits of being Cricket Australia staff with a discounted offer and potential glory of batting against a virtual Shane Warne at the National Sports Museum‘s King of Spin Oculus Rift Experience.

The lightweight virtual reality headset provides the player with 360-degree views, allowing them to seamlessly look around the stadium as if they were out on the MCG pitch in real life. Every small movement is tracked in real time, creating a natural and intuitive experience.